PLDN Talks – Marco Martini – ‘4 Tips to make mixing easier’


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Hi everyone. My name is Marco Martini. I am a music producer, mix engineer and sound designer on this video for Paradise London. I would like to talk about mixing. A lot of people think that mixing is hard and difficult, and you know what? They are right? Mixing is difficult and it takes years of practice to master this art properly.

So today I’m going to give you four tips that hopefully will help you to get things started. Tip number one, start with a tidy session before you start mixing. Make sure you’re ready. Look after all the edits, the tracks are labelled clearly and everything is well organized. Being forced to interrupt a mix session to do any cleanup work is very distracting and spoils the fun.

Literally do your homework first so you can play later. Tip number two, find the reference mix. If you’re new to mixing, but also if you’re not so new to mixing, it’s important to find something that can be a good reference for what you’re trying to achieve. For example, if you’re working on a heavy metal song, you might search for a Slipknot or Metallica song that has a similar vibe.

If you’re mixing a documentary, you can have a listen to David Attenborough’s, blue planet and so on. It’s important that you don’t get intimidated by the comparison with the reference you find, and most importantly, try to get as close to it as you can. Tip number three. Support your leader on every makes does always a leading track, whether it’s a dialogue, solo, or a melody.

Play by an obey. Make sure that the track, really shines and sounds beautiful, and then build your mix around it. And this brings us to tip number four. Forget the solo button. Do not work on the elements of your mix in isolation ever. Okay. You can do it every now and then if you need to spot problems on specific tracks, but that’s about it.

All the elements of a mix need to coexist, it’s like teamwork. Literally. It’s the balance and interaction between the single elements that make a mix something that is more than the sum of its parts. So you need to make sure they all belong together nicely all the time. So these are my four tips for mixing.

I hope you enjoyed them. Whether you’re working on music or documentary or a feature film, these rules always apply. Stay safe and happy mixing.

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